The amazing landscape in Rivière-Ouelle | The Bible

(Rivière-Ouelle) In August 2021, the Quebec government designated Rivière-Ouelle a cultural heritage site. The Bible Went there to understand why this small village in Bas-Saint-Laurent was the first, and the only one to have this status.

Posted at 11:30 am

Text: Iris Gagnon-Paradis

Text: Iris Gagnon-Paradis
The Bible

Photos: Olivier Jean

Photos: Olivier Jean
The Bible

Rivière-Ouelle is a village of only 1,000 souls dominated by agriculture, this year it celebrated its 350.would be anniversary. If you go to the heart of the town on the road 132, to see the most beautiful view, it is necessary to go to the country road to reach what the people here call “the point”.

Hidden below behind the rocky ridges that separate the area is a beautiful panorama. To get there, take the winding and winding Route du Quai, which ends at Chemin de l’Anse des Mercier, next to the beach of St. Lawrence.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

View of Pointe-aux-Iroquois and Anse des Mercier, from Pointe-aux-Orignaux

It is there, in this area of ​​land between Pointe-aux-Orignaux and Pointe-aux-Iroquois, that you will find the first cultural heritage site in Quebec.

Area of ​​selected land: 1,161,830 m2

This country is different for different reasons. First, there is this outcrop of land that offers a wide and beautiful view of the river.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

Louis-Georges Simard, Mayor of Rivière-Ouelle

People who come to this country are very friendly.

Louis-Georges Simard, the Mayor of Rivière-Ouelle, is a resident of the area

La Pointe-aux-Originals is located very close to the northern shore of the estuary, behind Quebec, which has enriched the history of the village. In 1840, there was a deep dock at Pointe-aux-Orignaux, which was used for the export of local goods. A ferry and rail service were added.


PHOTO GHISLAIN LÉVESQUE, COURTESY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

The docks of Rivière-Ouelle and Pointe-aux-Orignaux, as the bird flies

Thanks to all this, the place became a holiday destination at the beginning of the 20th century.would be century – Father Maurice Proulx, the pioneer of documentary cinema in Quebec, established his place there. Although the vacation is the main activity of the company, more and more people live there every year, which is surprising compared to the disease and the development of Boisé de l’ Anse, with its 40 new places in the middle of the forest. According to the city, forty new residents were added last year.

A unique ancestral experience

This particular area shows the great nature of the excavations at Pointe-aux-Orignaux. They have been fished in the area for centuries. Even today, Rivière-Ouelle is a beacon of this work in Quebec, which has been passed down from generation to generation in some of the original families of the village.

Among them, the Hudon family, fishermen since 1769 in Pointe-aux-Orignaux.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

Rémi Hudon, fisherman and farmer, in Pointe-aux-Orignaux

This year we have been fishing together for 253 years! Until the year 1864, we owned the entire area, Quai Street.

Rémi Hudon, the smoke fisherman, is the ninth generation of Hudon to continue this knowledge.

  • Every year, the nets, poles, nets and the three boxes used for catching must be replaced.

    PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

    Every year, the nets, poles, nets and the three boxes used for catching must be replaced.

  • First you need to plant the seeds in the soil, at low tide.

    PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

    First you need to plant the seeds in the soil, at low tide.

  • A line is fixed, guaranteeing the correct placement of the boxes.

    PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

    A line is fixed, guaranteeing the correct placement of the boxes.

  • Gabriel, 16, helps his father in his work, learning the basics of this ancestral tradition.

    PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

    Gabriel, 16, helps his father in his work, learning the basics of this ancestral tradition.

  • The tractor is used to push the trees into the ground, so that they can withstand strong winds and storms.

    PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

    The tractor is used to push the trees into the ground, so that they can withstand strong winds and storms.

  • The geese watch the fisherman's work.

    PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

    The geese watch the fisherman’s work.

1/6

When we meet him in the middle of August, the 41-year-old man, who also raises a group of dairy goats of more than 600, in addition to being the president of producers of goat milk from Quebec, which did not work: the weather eel. Fishing, which runs from September to November, is on our doorstep.

While explaining to us the purpose of fishing, Rémi Hudon is busy planting his “holds” in the low seas with his 16-year-old son Gabriel. It seems that the fisherman will do something bad, his knowledge is so deep inside him. “It’s none of my business!” he said, knowing what he was doing.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

The posts, then a net will be placed over the boxes. The goal? To trap the smoker, he has no other choice but to enter different boxes called the ansillon, the bourrolle and the box.

Together with two other local tuna fishermen, in 2010 he founded Les Trésors du Fleuve, an eel processing company that produces smoked sausages and pickles. With his team, he wants to refine and spread this delicacy of St. Lawrence. “North Americans eat very little fish,” he said. He hopes that this name will help to preserve this trademark in the country, if there are only ten fishermen left in Quebec.

Peace of mind as a symbol


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

View of the Rivière-Ouelle pier and Pointe-aux-Orignaux through the wild rosehips.

Little known, this corner of Rivière-Ouelle is appreciated by those who live there for its calmness, its isolation and its wild nature, far from the groups of tourists in the summer that invade a village like with Kamouraska, which is about fifteen minutes by car.

“Here, calm, peaceful. We don’t want to destroy a lot of tourism or promote business development. Peace of mind is our trademark,” said Mayor Simard.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

Pierre Laroque, Catherine Morneau, Isabelle Michaud and Alain Rathé sit on the board of directors of the Chapelle du quai.

“What we heard a lot during the public discussions was: ‘We don’t want to make the summit a Kamouraska’,” said Pierre Larocque, chairman of the board of directors of La Chapelle du quai , an NPO located a few steps away. the port of Rivière-Ouelle.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

The Chapel on the wharf, in Rivière-Ouelle

Since 2017, the converted church has become a cafe and a shop that allows you to see artists and craftspeople. Exhibitions, conferences and activities are organized there during the summer season. Unique products, such as a triptych of Marlone’s framed papers depicting the most beautiful landscapes of the island, were also created for the group. This year, the Chapel also built a belvedere nearby, allowing you to observe the many winged animals found there.


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

A great blue heron flies over the river in Rivière-Ouelle. One can observe about thirty species of birds in the area, even from the new belvedere.


PHOTO FROM MARLONE MONTREAL CENTER

Marlone created for the Chapelle du quai this triptych depicting three landscapes.

Originally intended as a community center, this area is frequented by commuters and people who come to breathe the salty air on the pier and on the beach.

It’s like a hidden gem here, sometimes it seems like we want to leave it like that.

Isabelle Michaud, member of the board of directors of the Chapelle du quai

Known as the perfumer behind the Monsillage group, Mto me Michaud spent his summers at the local family chalet from childhood and also sat on the board of directors of the Chapelle du quai. In 2019, he developed the perfume bridge roada marriage of country scents inspired by childhood summer memories such as sea grass, wild rose, driftwood and hay.

“Kamouraska is very beautiful, but personally, I really want to live here. It’s more peaceful. It’s not that we don’t like the world, but I think we can live together with respect to nature and the wild nature of the land,” says Rémi Hudon.

Located in Rivière-Ouelle


PRINT OLIVIER JEAN, THE PRINTER

An interpretation board of the Circuit Fil Rouge, at the port of Rivière-Ouelle

Founded in 2016 in Saint-Pacôme, Parcours Fil Rouge is an NPO whose mission is to show what distinguishes places and communities. Its top product is Circuit Fil Rouge, which is organized in the towns of Kamouraska, including Rivière-Ouelle, and in Charlevoix, and offers a circuit made of large explanatory panels, with additional podcast content. The one dedicated to Rivière-Ouelle will be able to discover, through about twenty markers, the history of the village, its established families, its built and unknown heritage.

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: